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dc.contributor.authorKibaroğlu, Ayşegül
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-25T15:40:47Z
dc.date.available2021-09-25T15:40:47Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.citationKibaroglu, A. (August 2021). The Euphrates-Tigris River Basin in Schmandt, J. Kibaroglu, A., & Thomas, S. (eds.) Sustainability of Engineered Rivers In Arid Lands Challenge and Response, Cambridge University Press. p. 94-107. http://assets.cambridge.org/97811084/17037/frontmatter/9781108417037_frontmatter.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781108417037
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11779/1557
dc.description.abstractThe water question emerged on the international agenda in the Euphrates–Tigris (ET) basin when the three riparian nations, namely Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, initiated major water and land resources development projects in the late 1960s. The political linkages established between transboundary water issues and nonriparian security issues also exacerbated the disagreements over water sharing and allocation. In 1987 and 1990, two bilateral Euphrates water sharing protocols were negotiated. They are acknowledged by all riparian states as being interim agreements. However, these bilateral accords failed to include basic components of sustainable water resources management, namely water quality management, environmental protection, and stakeholder engagement. In the early 1980s, the Euphrates–Tigris basin countries created an institutional framework, namely the Joint Technical Committee. However, they did not empower the committee with a clear and jointly agreed mandate. Instead, the riparian countries continued unilateral and uncoordinated water and land development ventures. Impacts of climate change add to the already complex list of management shortcomings. The basin is one of the most affected regions. The findings of science project significant decreases in the Tigris and Euphrates flows. Examining the water–food–energy nexus in the ET basin is important because there are serious pressures on the river system due to population growth, agricultural practices, hydropower development, and ecosystem mismanagement. We recommend that transboundary institutions should apply the nexus approach, which helps to identify key development drivers as well as to unpack and clarify the development challenges and necessary tradeoffs in the basin. Sustainability of water resources requires stability, cooperation, and peace. The sub-state level conflicts and illegal control of water resources and water infrastructure in the basin deprive people of access to sufficient clean water, energy, and food resources in Syria and Iraq. The prerequisites for establishing or restoring sustainability in a river basin include stability as well as establishing participatory, transparent, inclusive, and accountable governance structures.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.subjectEuphrates-Tigris river basinen_US
dc.subjectTransboundary water issuesen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectEnergyen_US
dc.subjectFood securityen_US
dc.subjectPeaceen_US
dc.titleSustainability of engineered rivers in arid landsen_US
dc.typebook chapteren_US
dc.departmentİİSBF, Siyaset Bilimi ve Uluslararası İlişkiler Bölümüen_US
dc.authoridAyşegül Kibaroğlu / 0000-0002-9648-5975en_US
dc.identifier.startpage94-107en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryKitap Bölümü - Uluslararasıen_US
dc.contributor.institutionauthorKibaroğlu, Ayşegül


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